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calamityjon:

Twelve of My Favorite Gene Colan Covers:

In respect of the memory of the recently passed Gene Colan, I present twelve of my favorite covers from his career. Mind you, I don’t know that these are all my absolute favorite Colan covers, but just twelve that immediately came to mind. Amazing work, every one.

The covers, in order from left to right in descending rows, are:

Top: Avengers #63, Howard the Duck #8, Daredevil #23
Middle: Night Force #13, Daredevil #41, Wonder Woman #288
Bottom: Daredevil #38, The Phantom Zone #3, Silverblade #5

I could’ve listed another dozen Daredevil covers alone, and I didn’t even get to Captain America, Dracula and Doctor Strange.

upfromsumdirt: sons-of-yemaya: Duke Ellington & John Coltrane | “In A Sentimental Mood” This jazz composition was originally written in 1935 by Duke Ellington.  It has been performed and recorded many times by various artists other than Ellington.  This version is best known and has been…

Today’s real life is yesterday’s science fiction

guillee:

Via Reddit, “Imagine yourself in 1995 reading a piece of science fiction about the year 2011”:

Mary pulled out her pocket computer and scanned the datastream. It established contact with satellites screaming overhead, triangulated her position, and indicated there was an available car just a few blocks away; she swiped her finger across the glass screen to reserve it. A few minutes later, she spotted the little green hatchback and tapped her bag against the door to unlock it. “Bummer,” she said as she glanced at her realtime traffic monitor. “Accident on the Bay Bridge. I’ll have to take the San Mateo. Computer, directions to Oakland airport. Fastest route.” Meanwhile, she pulled up Kevin’s flight on the viewscreen. The plane icon was blipping over the Sierra Nevadas and arrival would be in half an hour. She wrote him a quick message: “Running late. Be there soon. See if you can get a pic of the mountains for our virtual photospace.”

The future is awesome.

Today’s real life is yesterday’s science fiction